Tag Archives: eXPEDITION

Ex Winter Challenge 2015


Southampton University Officer Training Corps

After a long coach journey from Southampton to St Johann, Austria, 40 Officer Cadets from SouthamptonUOTC and 4 instructors arrived at the resort of Alpendorf at midday on Sunday 5th April.

Upon arrival, we were each issued with the necessary kit including skis and boots and were allocated our dorms for the week.

After an early start on Monday morning, we boarded the coach to take to Alpendorf, excited to begin our week of skiing. We were split into 4 groups, and introduced to our instructors for the week. The first gondola journey to the top of the mountain seemed to take forever, with the anticipation of the first run growing.

In contrast to the bottom of the mountain, at the top it was snowing heavily, which although sounding very exciting, made the visibility on the first and second day poor, requiring extra vigilance from all on the mountain. As the weather improved throughout the week, the views became more and more spectacular, although photos couldn’t do them justice. We began the week tackling the nursery slopes, practicing our skiing technique and growing in confidence, before moving onto blue slopes to challenge ourselves further. On the nursery slopes, we were taught how to slow down using the snow plough method, how to turn whilst in snow plough and also how to get up and put our skis back on if we were to take a tumble.

Fun on the slopes

On Tuesday morning we continued practicing what we had learnt on Monday, and in the afternoon, instead of taking the T-bar lifts on the nursery slopes, we advanced and took the 6-man lift for the first time! Throughout the week, the chair lifts became quite a spectacle and somewhat entertaining to watch, as Officer Cadets somehow struggled to grasp the concept and simplicity of the lifts. Ski poles were dropped and bent, goggles were lost, the automatic safety bar was forced up and even the occasional seat was missed! Each evening we came together for a debrief after the days skiing, and on Tuesday and Thursday evening, the instructors delivered lessons on weather, avalanches, kit and equipment, and first aid, which were required in order for us all to gain Ski Foundation Level 1 qualification (SF1).

Wednesday flew past, and the sudden realisation that we were half way through our week of skiing was surprising! The hotel that we stayed at offered an ‘All you can eat BBQ ribs’ night on Wednesday, which went down an absolute treat.

Friday was our last day of instructed skiing, and so the instructors decided to take us all to the same restaurant for lunch, called Krapfenalm. It was notorious for their delicious donuts, filled with either sweet or savoury filling, such as bacon, egg and potato, or chocolate, ice cream and sauce! Having all achieved our SF1 qualification on Friday, we were able to go skiing with other Officer Cadets on Saturday without the instructors’ supervision. Once we handed our kit back in to the ski hire shop, tidied our dorms and boarded the coach, the long coach journey back to Southampton began. I’m sure many others agreed that this had been one of the best weeks of our time at OTC and I hope to progress to SF2 next year.

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Exercise Himalyan Eagle


Captain Bill Holland 678 (RIfles) Sqn 6 AAC

Towards the end of October , I was fortunate enough to secure a place at very short notice, only 1 week before flying from Heathrow, on a Army Mountain Trekking Expedition to Solu Kumbu Region of Nepal to climb the MERA Peak an impressive 6476m mountain that dominates the Hinku Valley to the south of Mount Everest. I will be joining 9 other excited mountaineers next Tuesday at the home of 4 AAC, based in Wattersham, which happens to be our paired unit under FR2020′ the ten mountaineers I have been told have various degrees of experiences and ages, most of the members coming from from 4 AAC, to reward them after their busy recent Op Herrick tour. Captain Tom Stack an Apache Pilot with 4 AAC, is the leader and organiser who crafted this impressive trip over the past year.

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Thursday I got to meet Tom, at Bicester loan pool stores and assisted him in the collection of ten, individual sets of high altitude walking and climbing equipment required for this EX Ped. As always this is an important event and can be a time consuming task, checking the cleanliness and serviceability of every piece of equipment for the whole team to use successfully whilst on the mountain. Many items got rejected by us and quickly changed by ‘Angie’ especially the walking and high altitude boots ? to ensure we had the best start in the Army loaned equipment category in Nepal. My High altitude mountain experience over 25 years has been, Alps, High Atlas, Canada Rockies, USA, Norway and more recently Kilimanjaro, with some great civilians and 3 x amputee soldiers on a charity mission, as well as last year reaching Point Lenana on Mount Kenya with a group of Scots Guards, happy to say the photo was very guardsman like on the top. I have gained over the years my MLT and JSML scheme award and have organised SMF Summer Mountain Foundation courses in Wales and Cyprus. Basically I do like the mountains of the world, and being with like minded persons.

Major G Ridgley OC 678 (RIfles) Sqn. LT Col R Olney CO 6 AAC. WO2 Neilings 678 (RIfles) Sqn. Sir Henry Aubrey Fletcher LL buckinghamshire. SSGT Hamill 678 (RIfles) Sqn. WO1 Walkinshaw RSM 6 AAC. Capt B Holland  PSAO 678 (RIfles) Sqn.

Major G Ridgley OC 678 (RIfles) Sqn. LT Col R Olney CO 6 AAC. WO2 Neilings 678 (RIfles) Sqn. Sir Henry Aubrey Fletcher LL buckinghamshire. SSGT Hamill 678 (RIfles) Sqn. WO1 Walkinshaw RSM 6 AAC. Capt B Holland PSAO 678 (RIfles) Sqn.

I have four days now to prepare my personal items and paperwork that I will take, to supplement the good quality loan pool stores equipment we now have.  A trip like this is quite costly and can be very daunting to anybody, it should cost around £3000, however being partly self sufficient with experienced military personnel in the group, the Army manages to reduce it considerably to £1000. So I have quickly being asking for small grants from my immediate local fund lines and have been able to reduce the amount considerably, being in the Army Mountaineering Association also helps reduce your personal contributions. In repayment for these kind gestures I will continue a blog where possible, also give a swift short 30 min presentation on our experiences when I return to the bold funders. So to close for now, from one Tuesday helping organise a Lord Lieutenants Awards in High Wycombe to the very next Tuesday getting on a plane and flying to Nepal it has to be Army be the Best.

Look out for the next edition next week!!!

For more information on 678 (RIfles) Sqn 6 AAC  please visit: http://www.serfca.org/en-gb/reservists/armyreserve/678riflessquadronaac6regtaac.aspx

Exercise Inferno Tiger


Southampton University Officer Training Corps (UOTC)

Day 1

Having spent the best part of the day before travelling, the group woke up on the first ‘walking day’ eager to start, albeit fairly grouchy from their first night’s sleep in a tent. Having packed away the tent for the first time, a slightly more arduous task than expected, eaten our first camp breakfast and had our first kit check the 3 groups piled into the transport to be dropped off at the starting point in Meiringen.

Having been promised an easy start to the expedition to ease the group into mountaineering, some of us were not so pleasantly surprised by the speedy pace set by the first team navigators. However all misgivings were forgotten as we arrived at the Reichenbach Falls, famously known as the site whereby Sherlock Holmes confronted Professor Moriarty in Sir Arther Conan Doyle’s novel ‘The Final Problem’. The site also proved to be the first of many ‘selfie’ opportunities seen throughout the expedition.

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It was also on this first day that the ‘Team Rock’ phenomena began, the rules are as follows:

  1. The Team Rock must be carried by a member of the group at all times
  2. It can only be transferred to another member if they hadn’t been caught in the act
  3. The Team Rock must be placed securely within their bags, or the transfer does not count and the Team Rock must be returned to the original owner

However, seeing as the rock itself weighed approximately 2kgs, it was fairly noticeable if you had been ‘rocked’.

Having arrived at the campsite in Grindelwald, the group was pleasantly surprised to find the tents already erected courtesy of the Drivers. The evening was very relaxed, including a couple a drinks and the application of temporary tattoos before being briefed on the next day’s climb up Männlichen, followed by bed.

Day 2

The second days walking began with a very steep incline out of the campsite, which some felt, including myself was a foreboding start to what was going to be a rather difficult day. I was not disappointed. The climb up to Männlichen solidified the fact that the previous day had only been a warm up for the days ahead. After was seemed like a lot of teeth gritting we reached the summit all with a strong sense of pride, unfortunately we could not enjoy the view for long as the cloud had crept up on us.

The way down the mountain proved to be just as difficult as the assent, and for some of the more height conscious members of the group, more so. The route down was a steep one, meandering across the slope on a narrow path, our view littered with avalanche barriers. Eventually the descent led us into a more forested area and it was here that brought a little humour back into the group after a strenuous day. Jake, our mountain leader and organiser of the expedition, a man with all the gear the rest of the group envied, found himself in possession of a boot without a permanent sole and had to resort to sniper tape to hold his boot together for the rest of the decent. Secondly, whilst taking a small break the CO was ‘rocked’, whilst he was sitting on his bag giving us all a pep talk about the day so far. Spirits a little higher we headed into Wengen and waited for what would be a slightly unusual train ride in comparison to British public transport. After the train journey with spectacular views, we were picked up by the transport and driven to what would be home for 2 nights.

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That evening we headed up to Mürren via a cable car to meet Ann and David at their home. Having been suitably fed by all the food Ann had to offer, we ventured up to the local sports hall for a party which included beer, dancing, a band performance and more dancing. A good night was had by all.

Day 3

The third day saw a slight split in the group as Jake and the CO climbed the Schilthorn as the rest of the group travelled to the Trummelbach Falls, a series of glacial waterfalls contained within a mountain which had to be accessed via tunnel lift. The falls were astounding and beauty and the power of them was appreciated by the whole group, especially the geographers among us. The relaxed cultural day continued as we returned once more to Mürren that afternoon to witness the parade throughout the town, which was then followed up by a dinner of Fondue, which everyone thoroughly enjoyed, the fact that the cheese Fondue itself was strongly alcoholic may have helped. After saying goodbye to Ann and David for the last time after or course a commemorative photo outside the restaurant, we descended once more to the campsite for our final night.

Day 4

A day filled with a certain level of apprehension as it was the day of the most difficult climb so far as we were due to climb up to the Swiss Alpine Blüemlisalp hut at a height of 2840m. After leaving what had been our campsite for 2 nights we once again boarded our transport to the drop off point where our journey uphill began.

Although the majority of the day can only be described as ‘up’ some memorable portions of the day standout. When eating lunch at what was either a house that sells juice to passing strangers or a cafe that looked suspiciously like a house, Yellop was encouraged to eat some things not found in your average lunch diet. He rather bravely ate both a beetle and a cricket which was met with a mix of disgust and pride from the rest of the group. After lunch, whilst walking along a valley we obtained a temporary mascot, a goat we dubbed Darcy. Darcy followed our group for a good 500m and a good 20 goat selfies before we crossed a river that poor Darcy could not follow.

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As throughout the rest of the expedition members of the group took it in turns to navigate, a task I had avoided until now. Alas my time had come, although the leg itself wasn’t particularly difficult as the only direction I had to consider was up. It did however include an obstacle not yet experienced on the trip so far, crossing a glacier, where the CO rather graciously suggested he go first to test the route. My leg of the journey over, the group then faced what seemed like the world’s longest and steepest set of stairs up to the mountain hut. On arrival of the mountain hut the group was a mixture of tired, relieved and proud of the day’s venture.

That evening within the mountain hut we held a ceremony to commemorate the passing of 100 years since Britain entered World War I in 1914. Responsibilties were shared throughout the group, reading passages and scripture to honour the war. The Team Rock even played a part in the ceremony as a centre piece holding the 3 candles used.

Day 5

After the previous day’s climb the whole group was looking forward to a day of downhill walking to rest their aching legs. The journey down was fairly chilled as we took in the views of the glaciers which obviously provided a number of selfie opportunities which no doubt slowed our descent. After lunch we decided to take full advantage of the nearby glacial lake, changed into swimming gear and hire some paddle boats. Everyone got stuck in and really enjoyed the time despite the freezing water, which everyone ‘accidently’ fell into. After begrudgingly leaving the lake, we continued our descent down to the campsite at Kandersteg.

Day 6

Our final walking day brought mixed emotions to the group, and although the ascent wasn’t as high as the one faced on Day 4 up to the mountain hut, it was still a fair climb to the summit of Bunderspitz. Either we were feeling particularly keen that day or we had finally got into the swing of walking because as a group we were making good time on the ascent, so much so that the CO suggested that we split into 2 groups, one keeping the steady state along the original route, the other took a slightly more challenging route across a scree slope. Eventually we met up just before the final ascent to the summit of the mountain, where there were many shameless photos taken and we left an note in the guest book situated at the top.

For some, including myself, the journey down the mountain was more difficult than the ascent, the steep downward spiral seemed never-ending. We did however reach the end of our final walking day and arrived at the barn in Adelboden where we would be spending the night. The hospitality of the owners was incredible, as was the accommodation, and food. After we were suitable stuffed silly after the best meal we had eaten in days the B Coy among the group provided a skit which had everyone in fits of laughter as the performed the most memorable parts of the trip so far with spot on accuracy in their impressions. The night was then rounded off with the classic ‘Paper Plate’ awards hosted by Toby which was a nice way to round off the expedition because although we had one day left, the walking days were behind us; the CO was due to leave the next day and everyone was in high spirits.

Day 7

Waking up in the barn the following morning the group were in slightly hungover but excitable spirits, as the plan for the day was to visit a water park, a nice treat to spoil ourselves after the hard week of walking. But first we packed up all our gear, gave the transport a quick once over and then set off to what would be our final campsite in Berne. Having established out camp, we head off to the water park which could only be described as carnage as we took over the place.

Having exhausted the water park we returned to camp and that evening enjoyed the long awaited final night BBQ which got everyone involved and proved to be the most social evening of the entire expedition. The evening was filled of anecdotes of the trip, beer and most importantly, very good food. As good as the night was, it was also filled with sadness as it was the final night in Switzerland and the next day we would begin our travels back to Southampton where we would no doubt all face the ‘post AT blues’ and sicken our friends with tales of our times on Ex Inferno Tiger.

EX COCKNEY FREEZE


LCpl Aime Daniel -38 Signal Regimental skiing

Still buzzing from my latest adventures Ex NORTHERN PEAK, mountaineering in Arizona and taking part in Ex LION STAR in Cyprus. LCpl Aime Daniel of 1 Signal Sqn, Milton Keynes had the opportunity to participate in Ex COCKNEY FREEZE the 38 Signal Regimental skiing trip.

26 members of the Regiment deployed to Les Carroz, a beautiful ski resort in France. I’d never seen so much snow in my life it was breathtaking. Once everyone was finally sorted with the right kit it was soon time to ski. Being a beginner skier with absolutely no experience is quite daunting when you first get on the slopes, but it had been made perfectly clear that Adventurous training “is not a holiday”.

Group Photograph

Group Photograph

After a series of graceful face plants and forgetting how to apply the brakes on many occasions I soon started to get the hang of it. Of course having and instructor as passionate about the sport as ours with his awesome use of vocabulary helped in more ways then one I thoroughly enjoyed throwing myself of the slopes by the end of the day.

WO2 Andy Medley liked to push us to our limits so by day two he had me on my first blue run. After many superwoman dives WO2 Medley realised how scared I was and with a bit of encouragement I finally made it to the end of the run. It felt amazing, a well earned pat on the back kind of achievement.

LCpl Aime Daniel tackles the rollers on the nursery slope

LCpl Aime Daniel tackles the rollers on the nursery slope

As the days passed the whole group progressed amazingly some picked it up quicker than others and some preferred giving in to gravity and spending most of their time on the deck.

Challenges continued with a night ski but at least we couldn’t tell that this was our first Red run.

As the days went by skiing became more natural and on the last full day the survivors of the beginners group found their competitive side in a race against the advanced middle group down a blue run which we won.

Its safe to say I had the time of my life skiing and its definitely something I am going to do again. Although “it’s not a holiday”, all in all it was an awesome experience and I learnt a lot more then I thought I could.

By LCpl Amie-Louise Daniel

103 Battalion REME


Ex-Himalayan Tiger

As we sat in the tea house, considering an apple pie masquerading as a Cornish pasty, we began to   wonder exactly what it was that we had got ourselves into.  We were 50m away from Lukla’s airstrip – aka the World’s scariest airport, and several days walk from Everest Base Camp via a lot of “Nepali flat”.  It seemed a long time since the posters had first been put up around the Battalion advertising “the trip of a lifetime” to Nepal.  With just 12 places available for members of 103 Bn REME, the selection involved a classic English trudge across the South Downs one delightfully damp weekend in November 2012, followed by an extreme weekend in Brecon doing the Pen y fan route in Force 8+ winds in Feb 2013.  Suddenly the training weekends we’d completed in the UK didn’t seem preparation enough when considering the mountains we could see out of the window.

View of the mountains

View of the mountains

We’d been in the country for 4 days at this point, and were already 2 days behind schedule.  After sitting in the chaos of Kathmandu domestic airport for 2 days waiting for the weather to clear, we’d given up on the airplane and arranged for a more exciting and possibly less terrifying helicopter flight.  Our first experience of a tea house (trekking phrase for a youth hostel really) was something of an eye opener.  The rooms were basic but nice, and the beds had what looked like mattresses on – they even had sheets and blankets, although you probably wouldn’t want to sleep in them without the protection of your sleeping bag.  But it was just so cold.  This turned out to be one of the themes of the trip, with the temperature decreasing as the altitude increased.  By the time we got to 5545m at Kala Pattar most of us were dreaming of being on a beach in the Bahamas.  But the experience was outstanding.

The glacier we crossed

The glacier we crossed

We made it to Namche Bazaar at the end of Day 2, the main town of the SagamarthaNational Park, the Nepalese name for Everest.  This was our last real sign of civilisation for the next 8 days, and sold almost everything you could wish to buy.  The most amazing part of this is that everything is carried up to Namche either on a Porter’s back, or using Donkeys or Zos.   A Zo is a cross between a Yak and a cow.  We even passed a porter carrying a full sized fridge freezer on his back.  This humbled us somewhat as our measly 15kg rucksacks didn’t really compare.   From Namche our route quickly took us away from the crowds, as we headed North to the beautiful Gokyo lakes.  We had a poignant two minutes silence on Remembrance Sunday next to one of the lakes, surrounded by a thin layer of snow.  The following morning, we had a 0330 hours start in order to climb Gokyo peak in time for sunrise, which was by far the coldest moment of most of our lives, but an incredibly satisfying achievement and a real experience to see the sun rise on Mount Everest.  And we soon forgot about the cold that day, as our route took us over a swelteringly hot glacier.  Crossing a glacier was another first for many of us.  Because of the amount of rock debris that the glacier had collected it took a while for most of us to realise there was any ice at all.  And the huge peaks and troughs on the surface meant that there was little air movement.  The next day was another big marker in our trek, as we headed East to cross the Cho La Pass.  While the group had known this was likely to be the most challenging day of the trek, the sheer scale of it surprised many of us.  It took 4 hours just to get to the top and the last part involved climbing up a wall of snow that was at the limit of what we were able to trek without crampons.  Stepping into the sunshine at the summit of the pass and feeling the heat from the sun was glorious.

The team at the top of Cho La Pass

The team at the top of Cho La Pass

We then wound our way through the valleys as we headed towards Everest base camp.  The altitude was starting to show in everybody.  Energy levels were generally sapped while the body worked hard just to keep the vital functions going; loss of appetite meant that eating anything was becoming a real effort; and trying to drink 4 – 5 litres a day was getting harder and harder.  Reaching the summit of Kala Pattar became an even bigger highlight, because the rest of the trek was then spent walking down to lower altitudes where simple tasks such as breathing were so much easier.   Four days later we found ourselves back at Lukla airstrip, although this time we were allowed to pop into the Irish bar to see what the breweries of Kathmandu had to offer.  As we flew back into the city and said goodbye to the mountains, the rose tinted glasses were already coming over.  With the odd comment of “well, it wasn’t that hard really”, and “Cho La Pass wasn’t that cold”, and with the prospect of a hot shower, a bed with a duvet, and more than Dal Bhat to choose on the menu, that contented feeling was starting to come over all of us.  All round a fantastic trip, and very much the challenge of a lifetime.

If you are interested in joining the REME please visit http://www.serfca.org/en-gb/reservists/ta/rhq103bnreme.aspx

 

 

 

Turkey – Gallipoli Battlefield Tour 23 – 26 May 13


135 Independent Geographic Squadron Royal Engineers

In the very  early hours of the 23 May, 15 soldiers from Ewell based 135 Independent Geographic Squadron Royal Engineers  made their way to Luton airport for the trip to Istanbul. Having been briefed on the visit, it wasn’t long before somebody got found out for not paying attention to the finer points of the joining instructions.

When boarding the flight, 14 of the 15 got on ok, but I didn’t. Packing lightly isn’t something that comes easily to me so I ended up shelling out £40 to Easyjet as my bag needed to go in the hold, due to its weight and size. What I wasn’t expecting was that this charge would mean that Easyjet didn’t do anything with it, as it turned out they wanted me to take it to the plane – what was the charge for again?

After a 4 hour flight we arrived in Turkey, all wide eyed to what we were about to experience. The trip to the hotel was achieved by boarding almost all forms of public transport, starting with a bus trip then a boat ride and ending with a tram journey.

On arrival at the hotel everyone seemed keen to get a shower and fresh clothes, but this was delayed when the hotel manager could only inform us that our booking was cancelled and we had no rooms.  After many phone calls and haggling we managed to get a hotel in a neighbouring street, which actually seemed better than the original.

The Sqn at the Çanakkale Martyrs Memorial

The Sqn at the Çanakkale Martyrs Memorial

I had pretty much learnt that Turkish people are quite friendly people who are big on hospitality and making there guests welcome. It was also very evident about  their national pride, as most of the Turkish flags are big enough to be seen for miles.

We also made sure the trip was packed with cultural visits to various places of interest within Istanbul. Sgt Walshe being the tour guide was a bonus, as it made visits to the Hagia Sophia and the city walls come to life……The man is a walking encyclopaedia!

We were also all tasked in teams of three with answering questions related to the Gallipoli conflict a few weeks before the trip, this was to encourage us to study more about the history and the understand the purpose of the trip. Many of the presentations were very well put together, and each team took it in turns to present theirs throughout the visit.

On the last full day of the trip we made the long journey from Istanbul to Gallipoli, which was only interrupted by the mini bus having a cam belt snap.  Once the trip resumed we could look forward to seeing all the beaches that the Allied Forces landed.  Here we saw the difficult terrain the Allied forces had to fight on, and were better able to appreciate why the landings had resulted in such huge casualties and the ultimate failure of the campaign.

I for one hadn’t realised the task ANZAC forces had in taking the cove. Having seen the film of the event, and now actual visiting it I could now fully understand why they struggled to move forward. The Turkish forces had tactical supremacy as they occupied the high ground.  I had also learnt from the trip that allied forces may have actually been successful if the British had continued to make ground and keep momentum, of which they didn’t.

At the British forces memorial WO2 Hunt was able to locate the name of a family member who fell all those years ago. Whilst it was interesting to see all the different Regiments and units that no longer exist, it did remind us of the huge loss of life that was a result of the failed mission of taking the Gallipoli peninsula.

The visit to one of the beaches that British forces landed on turned out to be quite an experience. Craters still exist in the soil along with pieces of shrapnel, and bullet cases. I even found some pottery but was quickly told that it wasn’t that old and I was just picking up rubbish.

Having seen the film about Gallipoli I now know that visiting is a lot more beneficial to learning about history. It gives a sense you were there, and also the conditions the men were in.  Hopefully we can all learn something from the mistakes made all those years ago.

Battlefield tours have a huge role to play in education. Sometimes a book or film isn’t enough, seeing the very place and understanding the reasons for the outcome can become more apparent from a visit. I would recommend anyone to attend a battlefield tour, not just to learn, but also to pay our respects to those who fell.

LCpl Will Dawe

For more information on 135 Independent Geographic Squadron Royal Engineers please visist http://www.serfca.org/en-gb/reservists/ta/135independentgeographicsquadronre.aspx

Cadets All At Sea


Gosport Sea Cadets

The Commanding Officer of Gosport Sea Cadets, CPO Tony Salmon, Civilian Instructor Renee Smith and 7 Cadets from TS Hornet tested their sea legs on Thursday after a trip to sea in HMS Blazer was co-ordinated by Mike Highwood, Secretary of the Solent Branch of the Royal Institute of Navigation and by kind permission of the ship’s captain, Lt Amie Jackson, RN.

HMS Blazer

HMS Blazer

The Cadets mustered on Fieldhouse Pontoon at the Joint Services Association Sailing Centre, Haslar at 0915 to watch HMS Blazer come alongside in very difficult windy conditions. However, being Cadets, their watching soon turned into actions as willing hands caught the mooring lines heaved ashore by members of the crew. Once the ship was safely moored alongside, the Cadets mustered for photographs on the upperdeck and then adjourned to the dining area for a safety brief by the Executive Officer and the Captain.

Lt Jackson apologised for the fact that, due to the gale force conditions in the Channel, they probably wouldn’t be able to spend as much time at sea as she would have liked but that they would ‘poke the ship’s nose’ out into the Solent and see how things went. Details were given on what the Cadets should do in the event of ‘mal de mare’!

Gosport Sea Cadets

Sea Cadets onboard HMS Blazer

As it turned out, all the Cadets proved to be true sailors and, despite really lumpy seas, no-one was seasick. Lt Jackson gave them her hearty congratulations, followed by a very informative tour of the ship and some light refreshments.

All in all, everyone agreed, it had been a very enjoyable day.

The names of those who attended are:-

CPO Tony Salmon

C/I Renee Smith

OC Amie Varndell

Cdt James Williams

OC Kelsey Palmer

OC Matthew Pipe

OC Amelia Frasle

OC James Kirwal

Cdt James Potter   This is the order from left to right of the Cadets in the photographs.

For more information on the Sea Cadets please visit : http://www.sea-cadets.org/